Breaking down Jon Scheyer

Scheyer has improved his point guard skills throughout his college career, but his best chance of playing in the NBA will be as a spot-up shooter. (Pic via slamonline.com)

Jon Scheyer came to Duke with a reputation as a big-time scorer. Four years later, he has expanded his game to become one of the best point guards in college basketball. The 6’5″ native of the posh northern Chicago suburb of Northbrook is averaging 18.8 points and 5.2 assists this season. Questions regarding his size and athleticism have many wondering if he will succeed at the next level. DraftExpress.com projects Scheyer as the 29th pick in the second round of the 2010 draft.

TTT presents a breakdown of Jon Scheyer:

Strengths: Good height for a point guard. Not a great athlete by any stretch, but coordinated and crafty. Able to get to the basket against quicker players. A 40 percent shooter from 3-point range with a solid mid-range game. An excellent shooter off the dribble. Good court vision. Unselfish and aggressive on the offensive end. A solid team defender; has averaged over 1.5 steals per game in his career.

Weaknesses: Limited athletically and weak physically. Has added some muscle to his wiry frame, but would likely get bullied in the NBA. In addition to lacking strength, doesn’t possess great speed or quickness. Has a slow release on jump shot and doesn’t get great elevation. Rarely gets separation from defenders, even at college level. Poor 1-0n-1 defender due to average foot speed.

Outlook: Scheyer has all the intangibles as far as leadership and unselfishness, but his physical limitations will make it difficult for him to latch on with an NBA team next season. Scheyer would probably be best served to spend a couple years playing overseas, where he could make good money and improve his game against solid competition. His best chance to make an NBA roster will be to focus on becoming a great shooter. Another Dukey, J.J. Redick, has laid the blueprint for Scheyer…work hard, get stronger, and there is a spot in the rotation on any NBA team for a long-range marksman.

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